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Tag Archives: Resurrection

No Prophet Is Accepted in His Own Town

from Google Images

from Google Images

One way of looking at these first events in Jesus’ public life is that Nazareth is in some degree like Cana (John 2:1).[1] What do I mean? Well, the meaning of the word Cana is “place of reeds” (Kana – G2580).[2] A reed was used as a unit of measure (Ezekiel 40:3, 5-8; Revelation 11:1) of six great cubits (Ezekiel 41:8) or about 9 feet. What I find interesting is that the town of Nazareth was measuring Jesus as they would one of their own (Luke 4:22b). It is difficult to see or understand the importance of a person when we think we know all there is to know about him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 19, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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From Persecutor to Preacher

Conversion of Paul

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Paul persecuted the nascent Church, because he believed that the fact Jesus was crucified indicated both he and his message were cursed by heaven (Deuteronomy 21:23). One might conclude that not only was he responsible for Stephen’s death, but that he was also behind the first persecution of the Church (Acts 7:58-60; 8:1, 3). As a result of the posture Paul assumed toward believers in Jesus, he became the Jewish authorities’ go-to person to get the job done concerning putting down this new Jewish movement (Acts 9:1-2). He excelled where others failed (Galatians 1:14). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 21, 2015 in Galatians

 

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Questioning Paul’s Authority

Galatians - Pauls Gospel

from Google Images

We see from Paul’s opening line in Galatians 1:1 that his authority as an Apostle sent by God was being questioned. From the very beginning Paul seems to emphasize that his authority came not from men but from God. Therefore, the men from James must have sought to undermine Paul’s position as a legitimate Apostle of Christ, before they could have hoped that the Galatians would listen to their doctrine, which removed its adherents from the grace found in Christ (Galatians 1:6). Apparently these men began by saying Paul was a man-pleaser. That is, he sought to please the gentiles of Galatia by not requiring them to be circumcised (Galatians 1:10), which these men taught was necessary for salvation (Acts 15:1). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 18, 2015 in Galatians

 

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How Can You Be So Obtuse?

Throughout the day there was, no doubt, and exchange of ideas and questions put forward as Paul spoke to the Jewish assembly at his residence in Rome (Acts 28:23, 30). The problem was that some believed, but, evidently, most did not (Acts 28:24), which was characteristic of the Jewish response throughout Paul’s ministry (Acts 13:45, 48; 14:4; 17:4-5; 18:6-8; 19:8-9). So, I don’t believe the ending in Rome came as a surprise to Paul. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 26, 2013 in Gospel, Kingdom of God, Paul in chains

 

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Paul in Festus’ Court

Festus remained in Jerusalem about ten days before returning to Caesarea. He arrived there with an assembly of the Jewish ruling class. On the following day Festus sent for Paul and put him before his court. Luke says Paul was surrounded by men accusing him of wrongdoing (Acts 25:7), but none of them offered any proof to support what they claimed Paul had done. Once again, Luke shows that those who opposed Paul did so without merit, reminding us of the words of Jesus: “They hated me without cause” (John 15:25). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2013 in Kingdom of God, Paul in chains

 

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Paul Before the Sanhedrin

It has been argued that, due to a lack of a plaintiff argument, the Sanhedrin proceedings were informal.[1] However, strictly speaking Claudius Lysias, the Roman tribune who commanded the Roman army in the Antonia and second in authority only to Felix, called the court together. How informal could that have been? Whether the intention was to hear Paul as a kind of grand jury to determine whether or not Paul had committed a crime or whether the court was convened in the manner in which Festus had thought to do in Acts 25:9 is uncertain. Nevertheless, a formal hearing was called, and judging from the cry of innocence by some of the members of the court (Acts 23:9), it functioned as either an authentic trial on Paul’s life or as a kind of grand jury. Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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Paul in Athens

While Paul waited for Silas and Timothy at Athens (Acts 17:15), he seemed to have gone on a personal tour of the city and found it a virtual necropolis of idols. Athens had indeed passed its prime and glory of the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. Rome was now the political capital of the world, and Corinth to the south had surpassed it in commercial importance, while Alexandria had outstripped it as a center of culture and learning (perhaps even matched by Tarsus, Paul’s place of birth). Yet, its illustrious past had gained for it the sentimental respect of the world. She was a free city allied to Rome and able to conduct her political affairs according to her wishes, and Athens’ reputation made her the Empire’s museum of Greek culture. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2013 in Gospel, Paul's 2nd Missionary Journey

 

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