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Tag Archives: healing

Healing versus Sorcery

tassel

from Google Images

After the woman who had secretly touched Jesus from behind in order to be healed came forward, Jesus said to her “Shalom, (or be at peace), your faith has saved you!” (Luke 8:48). Apparently, the woman may have taken part in a number of healing efforts conducted by “spiritual healers” of Jesus’ day. It is interesting that the original text of Luke, the beloved physician (cf. Colossians 4:14), doesn’t mention that the woman spent all her living on physicians who couldn’t heal her. That is, what we find in Luke 8:43 in some translations is contested by some scholars, but that phrase and others pertaining to physicians is found in Mark and is uncontested. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 6, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus and the Sinner

from Google Images

from Google Images

After Jesus’ first meeting with the leaders of Judaism since the beginning of his public ministry, Luke continued to record their response to him and his claim to be the Messiah. They seem to be very attentive of Jesus’ activity, challenging his disciples about his and their willingness to keep company with publicans and sinners. When Jesus saw what was occurring and spoke for his disciples, the doctors of the Law confronted him about his public religious spirit (i.e. fasting). Yet, at each turn Jesus responded in such a manner that exposed the apparent self-righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, showing how they overlooked the weightier matters of the Law, while they made a public show of their own personal religious prowess. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 27, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Strange Things and Paradoxes

from Google Images

from Google Images

Luke tells us that the response to Jesus’ healing of the man stricken with palsy in connection with his saying that the man’s sins were forgiven was paradoxical. The scribes and Pharisees claimed that they “saw strange things today!” (Luke 5:26) The Greek word for strange things is paradoxos (G3861), from which we get our word paradox. The question is then, ‘what was the paradox that Jesus laid before the Pharisees and the doctors of the Law that they found so difficult to embrace? The healing, itself, astonished everyone—both the people and the leaders. Nevertheless, the power or authority behind the healing is what left the leaders of the people speechless and without a comfortable explanation. In fact, Mark tells us that these leaders had never seen their beliefs carried out in this fashion (Mark 2:12). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 20, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Peter’s Mother-in-law’s Fever

from Google Images

from Google Images

Jesus was rejected in Nazareth and challenged in Capernaum, but his disciples trusted him, that what he claimed was true (cf. John 1:40-49; 2:11). Knowing this, it seems justified that the text should show that it was Jesus’ disciples who first asked him to do something on their behalf, not as a sign, but as a work of mercy. That is, they appealed to his compassion (Luke 4:38). This is quite different from demanding a sign like changing stones to bread or leaping from a great pinnacle (Luke 4:3, 9). They weren’t looking for signs and wonders that would appeal to their curiosity, but in their compassion for the weak, they appealed to Jesus’ compassion. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus’ Second Temptation

Temptation - 2

from Google Images

I have been discussing Jesus’ three temptations found in Luke 4:1-12. They are the same temptations found in Matthew 4:1-10, but Luke reverses Matthew’s second and third temptations. Nevertheless, in Luke 4:16 to Luke 6:49 Luke discusses Jesus’ temptations in the order in which Matthew places them. I have been discussing these temptations with the understanding that the wilderness into which the Spirit led Jesus (Luke 4:1), is not a desert or an uninhabited place. Rather, it was a wilderness of people (Ezekiel 20:35), that is, people who are absolutely devoid of the kind of spiritual understanding that would lead them to God. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 27, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Paul on the Island of Malta

Once everyone was safely on land, they realized the place was called Melita (known today as Malta). Melita was named by Phoenician sailors, and it is a Canaanite word meaning refuge. Paul’s knowledge of Hebrew would have been especially useful here in that the natives were so friendly and hospitable toward the people. Luke’s reference in Acts 28:1 to the fact they knew the island was called Melita may very well mean it was well named. The sailors may have recognized the island or the natives themselves may have disclosed the name, but it was the kindness and hospitality they had shown the shipwrecked people that Luke seems to mean when he says “they knew that the island was called Melita.”[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2013 in Gospel, Kingdom of God, Voyage to Rome

 

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Can Evil Be Made to Destroy Evil?

In Acts 19 Luke related a strange story about a Jewish high priest and his sons—seven in all (Acts 19:13-20). At first glance this strange story seems to place the power of God over against the power of magic, because the result of it all was many who became believers of the Gospel at Ephesus brought their own books of the curious arts, which they had used before they came to the faith, and burned everything as a testimony to their friends and family, who didn’t believe (Acts 19:18-19). However, is this really all about magic not being as powerful as the Gospel? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2013 in Gospel, Paul's 3rd Missionary Journey

 

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