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Tag Archives: Capernaum

The Widow of Nain

galilee-nain

from Google Images

After he healed the centurion’s servant at some distance from where the young man lay dying (Luke 7:2, 8-10), Jesus went to the town of Nain with his disciples, and a large crowd of people followed him (Luke 7:11). Nain was about 25 miles southwest of Capernaum and about 6 miles southeast of Nazareth. In fact, Nain was easily visible from the hill upon which Nazareth was built, if one looked across its southern valley. As he approached the city gates of Nain, Jesus saw a funeral was taking place. A young man, the only son of a widow, was being carried out of the city (Luke 7:12, 14). As Jesus looked upon the woman who walked ahead of the bier, he had compassion on her and told her not to cry (Luke 7:13). Then Jesus touched the bier and stopped the funeral from proceeding. Having done this, he spoke to the dead young man, command him to arise, and Jesus delivered him to his mother (Luke 7:14-15). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 17, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Context of Jesus’ Visit to Nain

galilee

from Google Images

Previously, we left Jesus approaching Capernaum from Cana[1] when he healed the servant of the centurion, but the healing took place at some distance from where the dying young man lay (Luke 7:2-10; cf. John 4:45-54), so Jesus was probably as some distance from Capernaum and not in the city. We know this, because the father of the young man immediately left Jesus when he was told that his son was healed, and he found Jesus’ word to be true when he met his own servants who told him his son was healed at the 7th hour the previous day (John 4:53). Immediately after healing the young man, Jesus retraced his steps to Cana on his way to visit the town of Nain, just 6 miles southeast of his hometown of Nazareth, and Luke tells us he didn’t arrive until sometime the following day (Luke 7:11). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 15, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Context of the Centurion’s Request

synagogue

from Google Images

One may ask why the centurion would want or need the Jewish elders (Luke 7:3) to speak for him. Ordinarily, the Romans were viewed with contempt by the Jewish people. They were their conquerors who continually oppressed them. There is no reason to think that the centurion should believe Jesus would treat him or his request with kindness. Therefore, he needed friends of Jesus who would act on the centurion’s behalf and make his request known in the matter of his dying servant. But, what about the father of the dying young man? If Luke 7:2-10 reflects the same event as John 4:45-54, why couldn’t the young man’s father simply make the request of Jesus and expect Jesus to respond favorably? Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Centurion’s Request in Luke 7

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Some folks see similarities between the centurion of Luke 7 and the centurion, Cornelius, whom Luke mentions in Acts (cf. Acts 10:1-4). Besides their both being of the same rank in the military, they were both God-fearers (Acts 10:1). Both would have been aware of Jewish traditions of uncleanness associated with contact with non-Jews or gentiles (Acts 10:28). Both were generous with the wealth they had. The centurion seeking Jesus loved the Jews and built a synagogue for them (Luke 7:5), while the centurion who sent for Peter was noted for his love for the Jews and his generosity toward the Jewish people (Acts 10:2, 4, 22). Although these similarities don’t measure up to proof that the two are the same person, I believe it is probable they are one and the same person. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Fishers of Men

from Google Images

from Google Images

Up until Jesus entered Peter’s boat, Luke shows us how men failed Jesus. They seemed to want to control him and use him for their own ends, like one would a powerful resource. In Nazareth he was met with unbelief, and when Jesus tried to show them the consequences of their unbelief (Luke 4:23-27), they sought to kill him (Luke 4:28-29). The Lord is not a lifeless commodity or spiritless resource we need to control. Just as we enjoy our freedom, so God enjoys his. He doesn’t force us to choose his way, so we shouldn’t seek to compel God to do our will (viz. “naming it and claiming it”). Our simple trust is all he requires. God must be free to give us a negative reply, if our relationship with him is to go anywhere. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 8, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Calling the First Disciples

from Google Images

from Google Images

It is actually John who shows how five men first came into contact with Jesus following his baptism. Andrew and an unnamed disciple left John the Baptist to be with Jesus on the way back to Galilee from the Jordan (John 1:37-39). When they arrived in Galilee, Andrew went to fetch his brother, Peter (John 1:40), and the following day Jesus found Philip, who then told Nathaniel who also

came to see Jesus (John 1:43, 45). These are the first five men who came to listen to what Jesus had to say, and it is implied in the Synoptics that some of Jesus’ disciples were with him in Capernaum and probably Nazareth, as well (cf. Luke 4:38 and Mark 1:13).[1] Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Jesus and Demons

from Google Images

from Google Images

The words Jesus spoke in Capernaum (Luke 4:31-34) must have been similar to what he claimed in Nazareth. In Nazareth Jesus used Scripture to say he was the Messiah, and there the community rose up against him. However, in Capernaum it was a demoniac that rose up against Jesus. One has to wonder if the demoniac in Capernaum tried to do something similar to Jesus that the whole community at Nazareth intended on doing. In other words, the demoniac, at least at first, may have been considered to be in his right mind by the community of Capernaum, because demoniacs, as a rule, are not permitted in the synagogue.[1] The man may even have been a well respected and feared leader in the synagogue. In this context he may have risen up in the assembly to challenge Jesus, saying that his claim to be the Messiah would end in the Romans destroying the nation (cf. Mark 1:24 and John 11:48), or at least the city from which Jesus began gathering a following. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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