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Tag Archives: : Baptism

Filled with the Spirit!

Spirit Filled

from Google Images

It was said of John the Baptist that he would be filled with the Holy Spirit from birth (Luke 1:15), and the Scriptures tell us that, after Jesus was baptized and returned from the Jordan, he was full of the Holy Spirit and continually led by the Spirit in the wilderness (Luke 4:1). Does this mean that Jesus wasn’t filled with the Holy Spirit from birth as John had been or that his filling was any different from that of John? I don’t think so, and the Scriptures don’t conclude that Jesus didn’t have the Spirit of God before his baptism, but was anointed with the Spirit at that time. Any difference one might see between the filling of Jesus and John should be defined by the capacity of the vessel to receive the Spirit (cf.1Kings 8:11; John 3:34). Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 18, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Baptism of Fire

Baptism of Fire

from Google Images

In a previous blog post (HERE), I described the baptism of the Holy Spirit or the Messiah’s baptism as referred to by John (Luke 3:16-17). Nevertheless, John describes the Messiah’s baptism as one “with the Holy Spirit and fire” (Luke 3:16; cf. Matthew 3:11). That is, it seems John referred to a single baptism or an immersion in both the Holy Spirit and fire. Some have understood John to mean Jesus would baptize his disciples with the Holy Spirit and the world (or those who reject him) with fire, but I don’t think John meant that at all. In Matthew’s account (Matthew 3:11) the single preposition en (G1722)[1] is used for both the Holy Spirit and fire, indicating a single baptism. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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Messianic Expectations

Messiah

from Google Images

The whole idea of the coming of Christ has very powerful features. Even today it isn’t difficult to get people wondering and hoping for the near return of Christ. In the 1st century AD those who studied the Scriptures knew that the time of Daniel’s 70 Weeks Prophecy was nearing its culmination. Some were already looking for his coming. We are told that both Simeon and Anna the prophetess of chapter two in Luke both looked for the coming of Christ (Luke 2:26) and the redemption of Jerusalem (Luke 2:38). It is entirely possible that the Magi that came from the east in Matthew 2 were high ranking Jews from Babylon who waited for and sought the coming of Christ. The problem is that the authorities at Jerusalem, though they knew of his coming (Matthew 2:3-6), didn’t seek him out, as the Magi did. No doubt, this is why John was sent by God. None of the Jewish leaders looked for the Messiah, and the people didn’t know enough to seek him. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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The Interest in John’s Baptism

John the Baptist - 4

from Google Images

The Gospel writers tell us that there was a great interest in what John was doing. In fact, even Josephus speaks of his ministry and says some Jews reasoned that the later defeat of Herod Antipas’ army to Aretas, king of Arabia, was evidently due to God judgment upon him for his killing John.[1] So, John was a force to be reckoned with, at least according to Josephus, who records that Herod feared John might use his popularity to raise a rebellion against him. The Gospel accounts show John’s public ministry ended with his imprisonment, specifically on charges of John claiming Herod was living in sin, because he had married his brother, Philip’s, wife, Herodias (Luke 3:19-20). Herod probably had John beheaded within a year of his arrest. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

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How Are We to Understand Apollos?

Apollos is an interesting figure, whom we meet for the first time in the New Testament at Acts 18. Paul has left Ephesus on his way to Jerusalem, and for the first time since Acts 15 Luke introduces us to a person who is preaching about the Messiah, but it is not Paul. What should we make of this, and why does Luke introduce us to Apollos but mention him no more in his thesis? Why does Paul in his letter to the Corinthians speak of Apollos’ mighty work in Achaia, but makes no mention of his labor at Ephesus or in any other part of Asia either in that letter or in his epistles to the Ephesians or the Colossians? Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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The Conclusion of the First Pentecost

As a result of Peter’s first sermon on the Feast of Weeks or Pentecost, as it is called in the Greek, three thousand souls came to believe in Jesus and came under his authority. They repented of their rebellion against God (an inward expression) and submitted to baptism (an outward expression or testimony) to the new life they were given by Jesus through the Holy Spirit. Peter concluded that the promise of new life was offered first to the Jews, but also to those who are afar off (Acts 2:39). That is, the new life of the Spirit was to include both Jew and Gentile. How this would be brought about was probably not understood at this point in time, but in a few years it would come clear. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 20, 2011 in Pentecost

 

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