RSS

Tag Archives: Annas

What Is the Wrath to Come?

Wrath to Com

from Google Images

In Luke 3:7 John the Baptist warned of the wrath to come. What is John referring to? The wrath to come is actually the coming wrath. That is, it is already present, coming continually upon the children of disobedience (Ephesians 2:2; 5:6; Colossians 3:6). The wrath itself is judgment (John 3:36; Romans 1:18; cf. Romans 8:1, 5). The particular judgment that John referred to concerned the mistreatment of the Jewish nation by the gentiles, which culminated in the Jewish war of 66-70 AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 18, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

The Magnificat

Magnificat -1

from Google Images

Mary’s song of praise in Luke 1:46-55 has been called The Magnificat for centuries. The title comes from the opening word of the Vulgate’s[1] hymn of praise at this point in Luke’s Gospel. Did Mary compose these words immediately and extemporaneously after Elizabeth’s greeting (Luke 1:41-45)? It is possible, I suppose, but Mary was a reflective person (Luke 2:19, 51). She may have composed part of it immediately and the rest later (or the whole), in the three months she stayed with and served Elizabeth. We simply don’t know for certain, but it is a beautiful hymn, which testifies of Mary’s reflective nature and her own knowledge of the scriptures. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 21, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Who is Theophilus?

High Priest

(c) Sunderland Museum & Winter Gardens; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Knowing the identity of Theophilus (Luke 1:3), could be key to understanding important themes within the narrative. Is he a believer, as some suppose, who was already instructed in the truth whose faith Luke was hoping to strengthen (Luke 1:4)? Some suppose the name is simply a title for all Christians. The name, “Theophilus” means lover or friend of God. While this may be true concerning a Christian, no other New Testament book or epistle is addressed in this manner. Moreover, neither is any work or letter of the early church fathers addressed this way. Therefore, such a conclusion should be understood as based solely upon supposition, not related to anything within the text itself, or anything outside the text that could be tied to either Luke or Acts. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 24, 2018 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Who is Luke’s Joanna?

Luke mentions a woman named Joanna in Luke 8:3 where she is identified as the wife of Herod’s steward, Chuza, and Luke tells us that she was one of the women who ministered to Jesus from her own wealth. Later, in Luke 24:10 we are told that Joanna was one of the women who visited the tomb of Jesus and found it empty, but she learned from an angel who appeared to her and others at the tomb that Jesus had risen. Both she and the women with her ran to the apostles and told them. This is all that can be clearly understood from the Gospel narratives, because only Luke mentions her in these two places of his work. Read the rest of this entry »

 
4 Comments

Posted by on August 9, 2014 in Gospel of Luke, Theophilus

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Why Didn’t Felix Release Paul?

Luke leaves us at the end of Acts 24 with Paul still in bonds. Usually, when a procurator left his office he either executed the prisoners he had taken captive for crimes worthy of death or released others. Yet, Paul’s fate was left for the next Roman governor to decide, while Felix returned to Rome to answer to Caesar for how he handled certain a certain insurrection that developed in Caesarea. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 12, 2013 in Gospel, Paul in chains

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Paul Before the Sanhedrin

It has been argued that, due to a lack of a plaintiff argument, the Sanhedrin proceedings were informal.[1] However, strictly speaking Claudius Lysias, the Roman tribune who commanded the Roman army in the Antonia and second in authority only to Felix, called the court together. How informal could that have been? Whether the intention was to hear Paul as a kind of grand jury to determine whether or not Paul had committed a crime or whether the court was convened in the manner in which Festus had thought to do in Acts 25:9 is uncertain. Nevertheless, a formal hearing was called, and judging from the cry of innocence by some of the members of the court (Acts 23:9), it functioned as either an authentic trial on Paul’s life or as a kind of grand jury. Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Who Was the High Priest in 56 CE?

Josephus offers us a list of the Jewish high priests extending from the Hasmonians to the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE. Dating them for the most part is not very difficult, if one follows along in his history of the Jewish people, and if one compares his work with the works of others that concern common personalities such as Roman emperors, and the presidents of Syria and governors of Judea etc. There are, however, difficult places in the list that are a bit confusing, where a strict reading leads to contradictions. One of those places in the list occurs when Paul was taken captive by the Romans cir. 56 CE. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 2, 2013 in Paul in chains, Paul in Jerusalem

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,