RSS

Author Archives: Eddie

About Eddie

I am a Christian. I am married to my lovely wife, Kay, for over 40 years. I have enjoyed growing old with her, and look forward to a few more years, if our Lord permits. I am also a father of two daughters, both are married to two wonderful men. My eldest daughter has two children-a girl and a boy, so I am also a grandfather! God has been so kind to let me see both of my daughters fulfilling their dreams while they follow Jesus. I retired from a telecommunications company in 2002, and have never looked back. I have found retirement much more fulfilling than living by another man's schedule. I enjoy studying the scriptures, reading a good book, blogging, and discussing my faith with folks over the Internet who like to discuss matters concerning Jesus. I had been a Sunday school teacher for about 30 years (including about 12 years teaching junior and senior high youths), but recently I asked to be excused of this responsibility (January 2019).

Stretch Forth Your Hand!

from Google Images

from Google Images

In Luke 6:6-11 Luke records for us an event that most likely took place during the Feast of Tabernacles in 27 AD. It was a Sabbath day, so this particular Sabbath would have been the first day of the Feast, an annual Holy Day, which occurred in the 7th month of the Jewish calendar. Jesus had come into one of the local synagogues, probably his own at Capernaum. This can be presumed in that a trap was laid for him by the Jewish authorities. How could they attempt a successful snare, unless they had a fairly good idea where Jesus would be on that particular Sabbath? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 7, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Acceptable Sabbath Worship

from Google Images

from Google Images

Luke begins the next portion of his record (Luke 6) with an unusual phrase: “And it came to pass on the second Sabbath after the first… (Luke 6:1a – KJV). Some manuscripts have an easier reading: “And it came to pass on the Sabbath…[1] However, other manuscripts[2] have a more difficult reading: as in the KJV above or as some translations have it: “And it came to pass on the second first Sabbath…” Scholars prefer the second and more difficult reading, but the reader must decide for himself. It is important to the context, but, if it should be the more difficult reading, what does it mean? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 5, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Jesus and Moses

from Google Images

from Google Images

In Luke 5:33-39 Luke records Jesus making four pairs of contrasts: fasting and feasting, an old garment and new cloth, old wineskins and new wine, and old and new wine. All have to do with religious practice and how Jesus disciples relate to God, versus how this was done under the Old Covenant. Some contrast the Church and Judaism, but this isn’t enough. The heart of the matter is not simply Jewish tradition. Rather, the problem is with the Mosaic Law. Moses and Jesus are at odds in this respect, namely, that law and grace simply have no common ground. One cannot cry out for justice and forgive at the same time. Nevertheless, Jesus did not come to destroy the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17)—i.e. to complete it, furnish what it lacked and pay its demands. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 3, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Jesus and the Chosen Fast

from Google Images

from Google Images

The doctors of the Law brought up the practice of fasting (Luke 5:33). They even named John the Baptist, whom Jesus considered righteous, as siding with them concerning the need to fast. In doing so, they asked Jesus why he and his disciples didn’t fast. Although they named John the Baptist as someone who agreed with them with regard to fasting, they never submitted to John’s call for repentance. Had they done so, they would have received Jesus as their Messiah. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 31, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Jesus and the Doctors of the Law

from Google Images

from Google Images

“Your sins are forgiven!” Jesus said to the man stricken with palsy (Luke 5:20), and his words were implied in the case of Levi (Luke 5:27)—and fellowship follows forgiveness. Although the scribes and Pharisees were astonished over the true meaning of forgiveness, they understood the man stricken with palsy must be forgiven (Luke 5:26), but they couldn’t see that the publican, Levi, was forgiven. How could he be forgiven of his sins, even if he left all, if he continued to associate with those who persisted in the abuse their authority over the people (Luke 5:30)? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 29, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Jesus and the Sinner

from Google Images

from Google Images

After Jesus’ first meeting with the leaders of Judaism since the beginning of his public ministry, Luke continued to record their response to him and his claim to be the Messiah. They seem to be very attentive of Jesus’ activity, challenging his disciples about his and their willingness to keep company with publicans and sinners. When Jesus saw what was occurring and spoke for his disciples, the doctors of the Law confronted him about his public religious spirit (i.e. fasting). Yet, at each turn Jesus responded in such a manner that exposed the apparent self-righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, showing how they overlooked the weightier matters of the Law, while they made a public show of their own personal religious prowess. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 27, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Is Levi Really Matthew, the Apostle?

levi-the-tax-collector

from Google Images

Some people today maintain that Levi of Mark and Luke is not Matthew. While both Levi and Matthew are tax-collectors (publicans), it is thought that the writer of the first Gospel was merely trying to reconcile the fact that Levi doesn’t appear among the Twelve in any of the four lists.[1] Why would Mark and Luke record Levi’s conversion (Mark 2:13-15; Luke 5:27-29), if he is never heard of again, not even appearing in any of the lists of the Twelve? So, the theory is that the writer of the first Gospel merely picked an otherwise unknown apostle to be Levi! Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 24, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,