RSS

Contending with John

John the Baptist - 8

from Google Imagers

It might be significant that immediately before the Jewish authorities’ argument with John’s disciples in John 3:25 that we are told John was not yet cast into prison (John 3:24). Personally, I believe that it is very significant. In fact, I believe the Jewish authorities, in this case probably the Pharisees (John 1:24) are directly responsible for John’ imprisonment. They may have brought along the Herodians (cf. Mark 3:6; 12:16) and got John (or his disciples) to speak against the adulterous marriage of Herod Antipas and Herodias. Once John could be accused of speaking out against Herod, that he was in an adulterous affair, the Herodians could have gone to Herodias to tell her, and she would have gotten Antipas to arrest John. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 20, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

What Is the Wrath to Come?

Wrath to Com

from Google Images

In Luke 3:7 John the Baptist warned of the wrath to come. What is John referring to? The wrath to come is actually the coming wrath. That is, it is already present, coming continually upon the children of disobedience (Ephesians 2:2; 5:6; Colossians 3:6). The wrath itself is judgment (John 3:36; Romans 1:18; cf. Romans 8:1, 5). The particular judgment that John referred to concerned the mistreatment of the Jewish nation by the gentiles, which culminated in the Jewish war of 66-70 AD. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 18, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Who Were the Generation of Vipers?

Corruption

from Google Images

God sent John, the son of Zacharias, to prepare the people of Israel for the coming of Jesus, the Messiah. From the very beginning of Luke’s Gospel, we get the idea that something is wrong. Luke doesn’t come right out and say what’s wrong, but what he does say implies corruption, and his implications cannot be missed by Theophilus, the high priest, to whom Luke’s Gospel is addressed. Earlier, Luke alluded to the days of Samuel, the prophet, when the high priesthood was corrupt. The implication is that in John’s day it was no different. Nevertheless, one cannot openly accuse one’s leadership of wrongdoing during the 1st century AD and expect to live a long life. John accused Herod of committing adultery by taking his brother’s wife for himself, and John was beheaded not long afterward. Jesus openly confronted the Jewish leadership (Matthew 21:23-46) and was crucified within a week. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 15, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

How Did the Jews Understand Daniel?

Understanding Daniel

from Google Images

Jesus claimed that the Law and the Prophets were until John (Luke 16:16), and Isaiah spoke of an age, or the time of the Jews’ service, coming to an end in Isaiah 40:2. Isaiah’s prophecy is at the heart of the reason for John’s ministry (Luke 3:4-5; cf. Isaiah 40:3-4). The end of this period marked the beginning of the time when the Kingdom of God was preached (Luke 16:16). In a previous blogpost I argued that the age that came to an end is represented in Daniel’s Seventy Weeks Prophecy as the time of the building of the Temple and the waiting for the Messiah, comprising 483 years (cf. Daniel 9:25). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 13, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

What Actually Ended with John?

Kingdom of Priests

from Google Images

Isaiah spoke of the Jews warfare being accomplished (Isaiah 40:2), that is, it ended, or was fulfilled. What does that mean? Later in Luke Jesus claimed “The Law and the Prophets were until John…” (Luke 16:16). Clearly, something having to do with the Jew’s relationship with God ended in the first century AD, and something else took its place, namely, “…since that time the Kingdom of God is preached…” (Luke 16:16). It seems an appointed time or age ended with the coming of John’s ministry, and another appointed time or age began with the coming of Christ. What can we know of these things? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 11, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Message of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - 6

from Google Images

According to the Gospel of Luke John lived in the wilderness of Judea until the time of his public ministry (Luke 3:2; cf. 1:80). After he was called by God, he went to the regions around the Jordan River, first of all because his ministry involved immersion (baptism) into running (living) water. Secondly, crossing the Jordan is what Israel did in order to take the Promised Land. John’s presence there may also point to the expectation of Christ’s ministry beginning at the Jordan River as the ‘other’ Prophet like Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15). Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 8, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Dating the Ministry of John the Baptist

John the Baptist - 2

from Google Images

Luke begins his record of the public ministry of Jesus by introducing him through John, the Baptist. We know from the infancy narratives that John was about 6 months older than Jesus and that he was born into a family of priests. John was a son of Aaron, but instead of ministering in the Temple, where all priests are called to minister (including his father, Zacharias), we find John in the desert. Instead of wearing fine linen (the normal attire of a priest – see Exodus 28), John wore camel’s hair (Matthew 3:4), implying rugged living (cf. Luke 7:25). Something is going on beneath the surface, things are not really as they appear, but what is Luke veiling, and can we know? Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 6, 2019 in Gospel of Luke

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,